Parenting Support - Just for You

The SPS Blog — Just for You — contains practical coaching tips and advise for parents of teens and young adults. (PS: There's tons of good info for any parent who wants to learn, grow and hone their parenting skills.)


 

Although this article is geared towards ways wilderness and residential professionals can help ease the transition for families, we also wanted the families in our Solutions Parenting Support community to know the work involved on the end of the professionals during this pivotal time. In an effort to continue collaborating on ways to guide parents in the treatment process, we want to share with the wilderness and treatment professionals, in our community, another prevalent theme we are witnessing with the parents we coach.

All too often, kids get home and fall into the same old habits and routines. Upon successfully completing a program, parents are typically given coaching tips and keys to success for a healthy transition back into the mainstream. While this information can be transformative, parents sometimes find it difficult to implement. It is very easy to return to the old way of parenting. So who is there to catch these families that fall through the cracks?

In Neanderthal times, the willingness without hesitation or ego-driven obstacles, to be critical allowed us to survive. It was important to criticize your shelter to the nth degree to ensure it could withstand the elements; 70,000 years ago it was necessary to criticize hunting and gathering skills, fire making skills etc. I can only assume that it did not take courage to judge or be judged, it was a necessary aspect of life.

We each have our own definition of courage. A google search defines it as: “Strength in the face of pain.”  The concept of courage came up during an icebreaker activity at a recent “Strengthen Your Family” workshop, when participants were asked to write down a strength and a struggle that they saw in themselves as a parent as well as a strength and a struggle that they saw in their co-parent.  They were also invited to share what they wrote with the co-parent.